WEDDING: BUDGETING

posted in: FASHION, Wedding | 0
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VOICE OF REASONING

Alright friends, there’s something important I need you to know when planning a wedding: You gotta fucking budget! You have to follow the budget like it’s the law!

Ok, yes, it’s very obvious that you should budget when you’re planning a wedding. I mean, the national average cost of a wedding is $31,213. California is $37,317. Those numbers are crazy right?! You think this now, but mid way planning a wedding you’re going to think:

 

“oh, what’s another $2,000.”

“$4,000 for flowers? Cheap!”

“My veil was 800- what  a steal!”

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SLIPPERY SLOPE

Before you know it, you’re going way over your budget, and it’s too late to turn back. I recommend checking out A Practical Wedding for budgeting. I used that site a lot to keep myself tamed.  A wedding is great. It’s a once in a lifetime sort of a deal (or maybe not.) But it’s important to remember that the money you spend on your wedding can easily be put into a new home. If you have the means then great! If not, be careful and don’t get yourself into a slippery slope. As a wedding guests, I only remember the food and the entertainment. No one is going to remember what flowers or place settings you had. Spend wisely, friends!

WHAT I DID

With that said, I followed A Practical Wedding’s guide to budgeting. I set aside my overall budget and split that into percentages based on vendors. You don’t have to follow the percentage exactly. Be realistic. If you don’t care much about your wedding dress then obviously the budget for that will be smaller. If pictures are really important to you then that may take a bigger chunk of the budget. Whatever it is, divide it correctly and realistically. You don’t want to be surprised or regret anything in the end.

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TEA CEREMONY AND CAKE

posted in: LIFESTYLE, Wedding | 2

Cultural-Discrepencies-

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One of my biggest issue during my wedding planning period was whether we needed to have a tea ceremony. In traditional times, a tea ceremony is where the dowry is usually given. Nowadays it’s just a ceremony that people do, it’s tradition. For me, I have no connection to this tradition. I grew up going to a couple of these ceremonies, but I also grew up watching the same types of wedding we all saw in movies. So how do you gap the discrepancy between these cultures?

For myself, it was important to remember that this wedding was not all about me. It’s to honor your heritage and give thanks to your parents for procreating what is to be your husband’s best-thing-to-ever-happen-to-him. But at the same time I just wanted a simple garden dinner where we all got drunk. So can you have it all? Yes, you can have your cake and eat it too!

I wanted to soak in the actual wedding day so we decided to have the tea ceremony a month before the actual wedding date. It was for our family’s sake, and really my own peace of mind. No longer did I have to hear the nagging and complaining of

You have to have the tea ceremony! Why are you being so disrespectful?! What will people say?!

After I agreed it was all rainbows and sunshine, well, at least momentarily. I let them plan it. I let them decide what they wanted because really, it was their day, and I happily let them do it. All I had to do was show up!

To be honest, when I told my mom I wasn’t going to have any type of tea ceremony I felt a bit guilty. Why? Other than the fact that my family kept nagging about it, it was also because I identify with being Asian. I eat Asian food, I speak Vietnamese, and well, I’m Asian. But most importantly, my mom really wanted the ceremony, and if there’s one thing I learned about weddings it’s that it’s really only 20% for you and 80% for the lady who popped you out.

In the end I was quite happy we went through with the tea ceremony. Everyone was happy, I got a bunch of red envelopes, and I’m a little bit closer to my Asian side now.

 

TYING THE KNOT

posted in: LIFESTYLE, Wedding | 0

 

Throw Practicality out of the window. This will be the beginning of many long posts about weddings. Think of this post as an introductory of sorts. Bear with me as I try to organize my thoughts into well thought out articles that’ll help you manage a wedding of your own.

My experience so far has been a struggle between being practical and throwing the most impractical party of your life. I think all weddings are difficult, juggling what your families want and what you want, but I think it gets a bit more complicated when you’ve got to mix your culture in this hot mess. More on this later.

I’ll be writing articles based upon vendors, negotiating, what key cultures to keep and what to throw away, etc.. Stay tuned!

P.S. The photo above is taken by none other than my photographer who I adore!